Category Archives: Goals

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An Executive’s Schedule – “A Day in the Life of a CIO”

Do you ever wonder how other successful career minded401k Compensation Hiring Talent Value Worker Workers Workforce advice bill.inman bill_inman billinman billinman.com blog blogging blogs brand career careerhacker careerhacker.com consulting education employee employment entrepreneur entrepreneurship goals growth hr human_capital humanresources job jobboard jobs jobsearch labor life management me networking office personal personalgrowth promotion recruiting recruitment resume salary temp temporary unemployment workforce-vision.com www.billinman.com www.careerhacker.com www.workforce-vision.com success professionals schedule and invest their time? Computerworld offers an short yet insightful look into the schedule of a prominent healthcare Chief Information Officer. John Halamka as CIO at both Beth Israel Deconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School has seemingly achieved career success retaining a position of high responsibility. Here is a look into a recent workday’s schedule for Mr. Halamka, as outlined in by Computerworld :

  • 5 a.m. Write annual IT report for Harvard Medical
    School
  • 6 a.m. Work on several Beth Israel Deaconess Medical
    Center strategic plans:

    • E-prescribing rollout
    • Radiology provisional/wet reads workflow
    • Ambulatory medical record support for travel clinic immunizations
  • 8 a.m. Visit Occupational Health Office for mandated
    yearly TB test
  • 8:30 a.m. Meet with senior vice president of quality
    to discuss plans for:

    • Infectious disease surveillance
    • Medication reconciliation in outpatient procedural areas
  • 9 a.m. Complete human subjects/Institutional Review
    Board submissions for two upcoming grants
  • 10 a.m. Interview with Computerworld
  • 11 a.m. Tape an e-prescribing video for the Healthcare
    Information and Management Systems Society
  • Noon. Write and send enterprise e-mail about daylight-saving
    time IT issues
  • 1 p.m. Attend Revenue Cycle Project steering committee
    meeting
  • 3 p.m. Review 2007 disaster recovery plans
  • 5 p.m. Dentist appointment
  • 6 p.m. Dinner with family
  • 8 p.m. E-mail
  • 10 p.m. Practice Japanese flute

Thats roughly 11.5 hours of work, 1.5 hours of personal appointments, 2 hours with family, and 1-2 hours of personal time (hobbies). For some that may seem like a heavy commitment, but consider that the average CIO makes about $165,00 annually (click here for more information).

A Day in the Life of a CIO. [Computerworld]

Also see:

Tapping the Power of Your Morning Routine

________________________________________________________________________
Career Hacker * http://www.careerhacker.com * By Bill Inman * http://www.billinman.com

The Most Satisfying Jobs

“The most satisfying jobs are mostly professions, especially those involving caring for, teaching and protecting others and creative pursuits,” said Tom Smith, director of the General Social Survey (GSS) at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. LiveScience provides us with a look at the Most Satisfying Jobs in their recent research report.

THE MOST SATISFYING JOBS

Rank

Position

Percent Satisfied

1

Clergy

87

2

Firefighters

80

3

Physical therapists

78

4

Authors

74

5

Special education teachers

70

6

Teachers

69

7

Education administrators

68

8

Painters and sculptors

67

9

Psychologists

67

10

Security and financial services salespersons

65

11

Operating engineers

64

THE LEAST SATISFYING JOBS

Rank

Position

Percent Satisfied

1

Laborers, except construction

21

2

Apparel clothing salespersons

24

3

Handpackers and packagers

24

4

Food preparers

24

5

Roofers

25

6

Cashiers

25

7

Furniture and home-furnishing salespersons

25

8

Bartenders

26

9

Freight, stock and material handlers

26

10

Waiters and servers

26

Survey Reveals Most Satisfying Jobs. [LiveScience – Jenna Bryner]

  ________________________________________________________________________Career Hacker * http://www.careerhacker.com * By Bill Inman * http://www.billinman.com

Getting Your Ideas Noticed at Work

Penelope Trunk discusses “How to get your company to listen to your ideas” at her Blog Brazen Careerist. Penelope states that “most employees don’t sell their ideas to their company properly.” “When you have an idea, sell from the perspective of the people who can make or break your outcome. Think about what obstacles would stand in the way for the decision maker, and then you do the work of making a plan to overcome them,” says Penelope.

In her blog post Ms. Trunk introduces Jeff Snipes, CEO of Ninth House, an online training company. Snipes presents the following 3 tips to presenting your ideas to your corporate decision makers in an ’emotionally intelligent’ manner:

How to get your company to listen to your ideas

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Career Hacker * http://www.careerhacker.com * By Bill Inman * http://www.billinman.com

Ten Highest Paid “Blue-Collar” Jobs

10 blue-collar jobs with highest annual earnings Occupation Average earnings of full-time workers

Drillers, oil well

$62,409

Supervisors, electricians and power transmission installers

$62,347

Locomotive operating

$59,517

Supervisors, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters

$58,062

Railroad conductors and yardmasters

$57,672

Power plant operators

$56,545

Supervisors, extractive

$56,228

Supervisors, carpenters and related workers

$55,833

Aircraft engine mechanics

$55,539

Electrical power installers and repairers

$55,395

Drillers are no. 1 in blue-collar pay. [Bizjournals – G. Scott Thomas]

Career Hack: If you are in a professional similar to these positions above and make less pay search for these titles on Monster.com in your local and consider submitting your resume!

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Career Hacker * http://www.careerhacker.com * By Bill Inman * http://www.billinman.com

Then and Now – CEOs

Everybody starts their career somewhere,even CEOs. Below are some interesting profiles of CEOs and how they broke into the business world:


Gary Kelly

CEO, Southwest Airlines

THEN

  • First job after college:CPA for Arthur Young & Co. in Dallas
  • Responsibilities: staff auditor,CPA
  • Annual pay (2006 dollars): $47,996
  • College: University of Texas,Austin
  • Degree:BBA, accounting
  • Year of graduation: 1977

NOW

  • Started with Southwest: 1986
  • First job title: controller
  • Current annual pay (2005): $748,699 Stock options (2005): 10,617
  • Company sales (2005):$7.6 billion 
  • Net income (2005): $548 million
  • Employees (2005): 31,000
  • Other companies on resume: Systems Center
  • “[My first job] was an awesome learning experience about working with people and about business. And it was a lot of work. I had the second-highest overtime in the Dallas office”


Judy McGrath

CEO, MTV Networks

THEN

  • First job after college: writer, WEJL, Scranton, Pa.
  • Responsibilities: writing copy for radio DJs Annual pay (2006 dollars): NA (“I had six roommates in a one-bedroom apartment, if that tells you anything.”)
  • College: Cedar Crest College, Allentown, Pa.
  • Degree: bachelor’s, English literature
  • Year of graduation: 1974

NOW

  • First job title: writer, on-air promotion/creative director
  • Company sales (2005): $6.8 billion
  • Net profits (2005): $2.6 billion
  • Other companies on resume: Condé Nast, Rock the Vote
  • “Trust your own instincts, but know that the listener/reader is the boss. And music is the highest art.”


Andrew C. Taylor

CEO, Enterprise Rent-A-Car

THEN

  • First job after college: RLM Leasing, a Ford Motor affiliate in San Francisco
  • Responsibilities: leasing and sales
  • Annual pay (2006 dollars): $54,409
  • College: University of Denver
  • Degree: bachelor’s, business administration
  • Year of graduation: 1970

NOW

  • Started with Enterprise: 1964
  • First job title: car prep and management trainee during high school Company sales (2005): $8.2 billion
  • Employees (2005): 65,000
  • Other companies on resume: none
  • “I started learning this business when I was 16, washing cars at one of our St. Louis offices. At the time, Enterprise was primarily local leasing company with few locations. Now we have more than 6,900 locations worldwide….I’m proud of our growth and dedication to customer and employee satisfaction — the things that have made this incredible ride possible.”

View more profiles at: First Jobs: Lessons Learned. [BusinessWeek Onlne]

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Career Hacker * www.careerhacker.com * By Bill Inman * www.billinman.com

Implement the Kaizen Philosophy in Your Career

The good news first – Kaizen won’t require more than 30 seconds of your time each day. All that is required is that you pay attention so what you are thinking, and focus on setting simple and completely achievable goals. The Kaizen way suggests that you take small steps toward continuous improvement, instead of attempting to create radical change that you won’t be able to keep up with and sustain over time.

So instead of declaring, this New Year, what you will not do you might think of one small thing you could do every day that is easily attainable. This can be something as simple as deciding to eat one bite less of dessert or taking 15 seconds in the bathroom every day to breathe deeply three times. That’s all you have to do, just take one tiny step whether it’s a new thought, or a new action.

Kaizen is a gentle easy approach to problem solving that will enable you to attain your goal over time. When you implement simple small steps, you avoid triggering the fear and stress response in the brain, which are often what blocks success and the achievement of desired goals.

Sound too simple and ridiculous to be effective? Well consider this. After World War II, the entire Japanese economy was devastated. Dr. W. Edwards Denning introduced the principle of continuous improvement as a management strategy. Thousands of business managers enrolled into Management Training Programs and embraced the principle now known as Kaizen.

As we know, the post-war economy of Japan improved dramatically and productivity soared. Today the most successful business leaders in the world are starting to incorporate the Kaizen way into every area of their organisations.

Wikipedia Kaizen. [Wikipedia]

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Career Hacker * www.careerhacker.com * By Bill Inman * www.billinman.com